Dark energy offered to look close to the Milky Way


Dark energy offered to look close to the Milky Way
Physicists at the University of Michigan suggested search for traces of dark energy near the dwarf galaxies , and tried to explain the reason why around the Milky Way rotates a small number of such galaxies. The work of the authors is available on the website arXiv.org, and briefly introduces her edition of New Scientist. Dark energy is believed to act in cosmological scales, so that its influence on the sizes of galactic events can be ignored. American physicists in their work have tried to prove that this is not always the case. To do this, they calculated the critical distance from the galactic center, which can become noticeable influence of dark energy. It turned out that this distance can be compared with the size of the galaxy. Communication between the mass of the galaxy (in solar masses) and critical radius (in kiloparsecs and Mpc) Image: arxiv.org So, for our Milky Way galaxy, which has a diameter of about one hundred thousand light-years, the critical radius is 1.6 million light years. This, in particular, may help to explain why around the Milky Way dwarf galaxies are much smaller than predicted by computer modeling. For dwarf galaxies that tens of thousands of times lighter than the Milky Way and extend for several hundred light-years across, the critical radius is much smaller. This allows astronomers to assume that at such distances from the center of dwarf galaxies can be seen the effect of dark energy on the slowing rotation of gas clouds around them.

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